Miramar Semper Fidelis Rotary - San Diego, California, United States

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Welcome


Chartered in July of 2009, The Miramar Semper Fidelis Rotary is the second of only three service clubs anywhere in the world that meet on military bases (the first is the Rotary Club of Camp Pendleton, CA and the newest is the Rotary Club of Naval Base San Diego).  We are dedicated to serving and supporting the Marines, Sailors, service members, and service family member of MCAS Miramar and in Southern California.  We will plan community service projects and fund-raising campaigns and events to support those projects and related causes.

 

Our membership comprises active-duty service members, civil service and non-profit employees, and business men and women and other members of the surrounding communities.  Please join us for lunch at the Miramar Officer's Club, at 1130 on Thursdays.  No reservation necessary.

 

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From the "Costco Connection":  Global eradication of polio?  Rotary International and its partners are in the home stretch.": 

 

Rotary Featured in Costco's Monthly Magazine
by Southard, Tacy

When Rotary International trained its sights on eradicating polio I the late 1980s, the disease was active in 120 countries. Today, after more than 2 billion children have been immunized against the polio virus in the past 20 years, the disease is endemic on only four countries - Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan. Its occurrence has been effectively cut by 99 percent.

Epidemic outbreaks of polio caused panic in the U.S. during the 1940s and '50s, leaving thousands of children crippled. In the six years after World War II, new cases averaged 27,000 each year, with that number peaking at nearly 60,000 in 1952. But the development of two effective vaccines turned the tide so that, by 1979, polio has been virtually eliminated in the U.S.

Polio is spread by human contact; people infected by the virus don't always get sick but can still spread it to others of any age. Most frequently, children under 3 years of age are infected. Less than 1 percent of cases result in paralysis, and less than 10 percent of that group may die when the paralysis affects the muscles used in breathing.

Rotary International, a global humanitarian service organization, has some heavy-weight partners in waging this campaign, including the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - collectively teamed in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI).

As the volunteer arm of the GPEI, Rotary focuses on fundraising, advocacy and mobilizing volunteers. Rotary's PolioPlus program has raised and contributed more than $900 million toward eradication, and Rotary's 1.2 million members in more than 200 countries actively spread the word and continue to do the work necessary for success.

 

A recent fundraising windfall came from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which announced a contribution of $355 million, with Rotary to raise $200 million in matching funds by June 2012.

 John Matthews, senior vice president of human resources for Costco, was active in Rotary when the campaign started, and remembers how immense the goal seemed.

 "In the history of mankind, we have only eradicated one disease - smallpox - from our planet; polio will be the second," says John, currently a Rotary district governor in the Pacific Northwest. "Now that we've almost reached the goal to eradicate polio, the takeaway is that we are all a lot smarter today about how to tackle tough global health issues, which can only benefit us as we tackle the next global health challenge."

 The vigilance can't let up with just being close to the goal, or even when the goal is reached. Polio can and must be totally eliminated, and each new generation will require vaccination to keep the lid on this virulent disease so it can't regain a foothold.

 You don't have to be a Rotary member to contribute to the fight. For more information or to make a donation, visit www.rotary.org and click on "End Polio Now."


 

Rotary Featured in Costco's Monthly Magazine
by Southard, Tacy


Global eradication of polio?

Rotary International and its partners are in the home stretch.


When Rotary International trained its sights on eradicating polio I the late 1980s, the disease was active in 120 countries. Today, after more than 2 billion children have been immunized against the polio virus in the past 20 years, the disease is endemic on only four countries - Afghanistan, India, Nigeria and Pakistan. Its occurrence has been effectively cut by 99 percent.

 

Epidemic outbreaks of polio caused panic in the U.S. during the 1940s and '50s, leaving thousands of children crippled. In the six years after World War II, new cases averaged 27,000 each year, with that number peaking at nearly 60,000 in 1952. But the development of two effective vaccines turned the tide so that, by 1979, polio has been virtually eliminated in the U.S.

 

Polio is spread by human contact; people infected by the virus don't always get sick but can still spread it to others of any age. Most frequently, children under 3 years of age are infected. Less than 1 percent of cases result in paralysis, and less than 10 percent of that group may die when the paralysis affects the muscles used in breathing.

 

Rotary International, a global humanitarian service organization, has some heavy-weight partners in waging this campaign, including the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - collectively teamed in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI).

As the volunteer arm of the GPEI, Rotary focuses on fundraising, advocacy and mobilizing volunteers. Rotary's PolioPlus program has raised and contributed more than $900 million toward eradication, and Rotary's 1.2 million members in more than 200 countries actively spread the word and continue to do the work necessary for success.

 

A recent fundraising windfall came from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which announced a contribution of $355 million, with Rotary to raise $200 million in matching funds by June 2012.

 

John Matthews, senior vice president of human resources for Costco, was active in Rotary when the campaign started, and remembers how immense the goal seemed.

 

"In the history of mankind, we have only eradicated one disease - smallpox - from our planet; polio will be the second," says John, currently a Rotary district governor in the Pacific Northwest. "Now that we've almost reached the goal to eradicate polio, the takeaway is that we are all a lot smarter today about how to tackle tough global health issues, which can only benefit us as we tackle the next global health challenge."

 

The vigilance can't let up with just being close to the goal, or even when the goal is reached. Polio can and must be totally eliminated, and each new generation will require vaccination to keep the lid on this virulent disease so it can't regain a foothold.

 

You don't have to be a Rotary member to contribute to the fight. For more information or to make a donation, visit www.rotary.org and click on "End Polio Now."

 

David Wight, The Costco Connection, October 2010

 

  
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Meeting Time & Location Information
Thursday at 11:30 AM
MCAS Miramar O'Club
MCAS MIRAMAR, Bldg. 4472, Anderson Ave., Marine Corps Air Station Miramar
San Diego, California
United States
Contact Information
Jason Katz- President
phone: 858-245-5289
contact us

If you plan to attend one of our meetings, please contact Susan Hathaway to RSVP by the previous Tuesday at:  SUSAN HATHAWAY, or by phone, 858-354-6365.



 

 

For a map to the MCAS Miramar Officers' Club, please click here!

 

To visit our Facebook page, please click here!

 



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